Jesus Christ Is Lord

That every knee should bow and every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord to the glory of God the Father!

Posts Tagged ‘liberal christian’

Christian Site Claims Barack HUSSEIN Obama is Most Pro-Life Candidate

Posted by Job on October 8, 2008

You know, since there is absolutely no evidence that John McCain will do any more to end abortion than did George W. Bush, George H. W. Bush, and Ronald Reagan, they may be right! And when McCain wins and does nothing on abortion for four years, please religious right, no complaining, and no investing false hope in Sarah Palin.

Christian Site Claims Obama is Most Pro-Life Candidate

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Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams Compares Homosexuality to Marriage

Posted by Job on October 1, 2008

Seriously, why continue to affiliate with this synagogue of Satan?

Anglican Head Compared ‘Faithful’ Gay Relationships to Marriage

LONDON – The spotlight is back on Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams today after letters emerged in which the spiritual leader of the Anglican Communion says gay relationships could “reflect the love of God” in a way comparable to marriage, according to media reports. Williams allegedly affirmed his liberal position on homosexuality in a leaked exchange of letters between 2000 and 2001 with Deborah Pitt, an evangelical living in his former archdiocese in south Wales.

According to media reports, Williams asserts in the letters his belief that parts of the Bible relating to homosexuality were addressed “to heterosexuals looking for sexual variety in their experience” rather than gay people in a relationship.

“I concluded that an active sexual relationship between two people of the same sex might therefore reflect the love of God in a way comparable to marriage, if and only if it had about it the same character of absolute covenanted faithfulness,” one letter was quoted as saying.

As a theologian, Williams is liberal on the issue of homosexuality but adopts a more conservative position as leader of the Anglican Communion, which officially regards homosexuality as incompatible with Scripture. (So … they are willing to allow people whom they know to be heretical and apostate run their church?)

The archbishop’s comments come just days after the conclusion of the once-in-a-decade Lambeth Conference, which reaffirmed the Anglican Communion’s official line on homosexuality. (Which means that this church feels that it is OK to lie for expediency’s sake.) Bishops at the conference, which ended on Sunday, called for an immediate halt to same-sex consecrations and blessings, and the suspension of cross-border interventions.

Williams said at the end of the conference that the Anglican Communion would be in “grave peril” if member churches failed to observe the moratorium.

The 77-million member Anglican Communion has been wracked with division, particularly since the 2003 consecration of openly gay bishop Gene Robinson of New Hampshire. More than 200 conservative bishops boycotted the Lambeth Conference in protest of the presence of pro-gay bishops, including some of those involved in the consecration of Robinson. They held their own meeting, the Global Anglican Future Conference (GAFCON), in Jerusalem in June.

In his strongest public acknowledgement of GAFCON to date, Williams had said he would look for ways to “build bridges” with bishops in the movement, who include Nigerian Archbishop Peter Akinola, Ugandan Archbishop Henry Orombi, Sydney Archbishop Peter Jensen, and a number of UK bishops, including the Bishop of Rochester, the Rt. Rev Michael Nazir-Ali. (Please. The Bible forbids building bridges to apostasy.)

Williams said he would send out a pastoral letter to each of the GAFCON bishops as a first step, but added that the bridge-building process would need some “teasing out” in the coming months

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Barack HUSSEIN Obama On The Bible

Posted by Job on September 29, 2008

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The Southern Baptist Convention’s Lifeway Bookstores Is Right: Gospel Today Magazine IS Promoting Women Pastors!

Posted by Job on September 19, 2008

Gospel Today magazine pulled from Christian bookstores’ shelves

Now do not go overboard in your praise of Lifeway, for they also carry the heresies of not only Rick Warren, but also oneness pentecostal prosperity doctrine word of faith T.D. Jakes. But in this matter, Lifeway is 100% correct. Gospel Today made their decision easy by telegraphing the fact that they are obviously promoting being conformed to the ways of this world rather than following scripture with this quote:

“It’s really kind of sad when you have people like [Gov.] Sarah Palin and [Sen.] Hillary Clinton providing encouragement and being role models for women around the world that we have such a divergent opinion about women who are able to be leaders in the church,” Hairston said. “I was pretty shocked.” 

Not only is this worldliness, but it is deception and dishonesty, flat out lying with the willful intent to confuse, mislead, and deceive Christians. Hairston well knows that the Bible only withholds from women positions of leadership over men, including pastorates, in the church and in the home. Outside of the church and home, a woman can hold any position that she wants: CEO, president, lawyer, doctor, you name it. And the Bible practices what it preaches, for Lydia of Thyatira of Acts was an entrepreneur/businesswoman who opened her house to the very New Testament writer whom the Holy Spirit inspired to restrict women from pastorates, apostle Paul. Lydia is credited with founding one of the apostolic churches in her home and therefore played a key role in bringing the gospel to a new area, but she was not a pastor. If these people are willing to throw away what the Bible says on women pastors to follow Hillary Clinton and Sarah Palin today, what other confusion and disobedience will they cast aside the Bible in order to follow tomorrow? Hillary Clinton’s embrace of universalism and abortion? Or what about Sarah Palin’s refusal to denounce the sin of homosexuality, claiming that she has “diversity in her family”, thereby implying that being homosexual is no different from being Native American like her own husband and children? The same Palin who can proclaim that God’s will is being advanced by our invading Iraq and her seeking federal money to build an oil pipeline in her state says that she is unqualified to discern and judge what the Bible plainly says about homosexuality? And we are still looking for the snipers that were shooting at Hillary Clinton in Bosnia, aren’t we? And these are the people that Gospel Today wants you to cast aside your Bibles for and follow? It is becoming ever easier to determine in this day and age who is loving Jesus Christ by keeping His commandments (John 14:15)  and who isn’t. In many cases all that is required is to open your eyes.

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Trying To Guilt – Or Frighten – Whites Into Voting For Barack HUSSEIN Obama!

Posted by Job on September 17, 2008

Please see this article: The Big ‘What If’. In it, Randall Kennedy not so subtly states his case for why Obama should be president.

1. Blacks in America have been through SOOOO much.

2. Blacks in America that have been through SOOOO much will be … well let me just quote him: 

“If Obama loses, I personally will feel disappointed, frustrated, hurt. I’ll conclude that a fabulous opportunity has been lost. I’ll believe that American voters have made a huge mistake. And I’ll think that an important ingredient of their error is racial prejudice — not the hateful, snarling, open bigotry that terrorized my parents in their youth, but rather a vague, sophisticated, low-key prejudice that is chameleonlike in its ability to adapt to new surroundings and to hide even from those firmly in its grip. If Obama is defeated, I will, for a brief time, be stunned by feelings of dejection, anger and resentment.”

Consider the unmentioned context. If this is how I, a Princeton educated  civilized black man, will react, then imagine how THOSE PEOPLE OVER THERE will react? What will THOSE PEOPLE OVER THERE do? Imagine it, white folks. If you don’t keep us pacified by voting for Obama, roving hordes of black males will invade your neighborhoods and steal your jewels and money, burn your homes and businesses to the ground, put your sons to the edge of the sword, and ravish your pure virgin daughters!

Reminds me of the accounts of the shakedown hustles during the civil rights movement that I read about. A civil rights leader would hold a march, inflame the passions of blacks and whites with purposefully incendiary overcharged rhetoric, and then then GET OUT OF DODGE FAST WHEN THE INEVITABLE RIOT HAPPENS. Why do I say “inevitable”? Because that was the purpose of the march and especially the speech. Make no mistake: the civil rights leaders were MARXISTS. Inciting street riots and other violent subversive behavior was standard operating procedure for the radical left, and in some nations the goal was to get so many people rioting on an almost continuous basis that the country would basically shut down (which leads to even more riots due to people unable go to work or buy food) that it mushrooms into a full blown coup. So the myth that the civil rights movement was “nonviolent” was one of the biggest lies in our recent national history, with the media and our government financed and controlled education system fully complicit, and the people who spoke the truth about what was going on branded as racist and therefore dismissed. 

So, the strategy was to start a riot in city A, then go to city B and tell them “agree to our concessions or you are next.” That is what Shelby Steele was only hinting at when he called Martin Luther King, Jr. a “bargainer” and suggested that Obama was following in his footsteps. The truth is that King used the threat and fear of black violence, black criminality, to manipulate white people. Had the civil rights movement been a true civil rights movement, its goal would have been to convince whites that blacks were the moral, social, cultural, and intellectual equal of whites and to afford blacks the opportunity to demonstrate it. (While the hero of sorts of modern neoconservatives, freemason Booker T. Washington, offered an alternative program that was not without flaws, it nonetheless was his basic strategy.) Instead, the fake civil rights movement encouraged whites to view blacks as rapists, thieves, arsonists, and murderers so they would do whatever it took to pacify us animal beasts (yes, I say US for I am black), including legal, political, and financial payoffs.

To this day, this mentality persists. Civil rights leaders to this day blame illegitimacy, crime, abortions, AIDS, unemployment, low educational attainments, and riots (which fortunately have not occured as often this decade as they did in the 80s and 90s) on the persistent refusal of the white majority of this country to submit to Marxism. That blacks should conduct ourselves and be productive moral people no matter the political or economic system just as whites, Jews, Asians, Hispanics who enter this country legally, and EVEN BLACKS WHO EMIGRATE HERE FROM AFRICA, LATIN AMERICA, AND THE CARIBBEAN do is never discussed, for the advancement of the civil rights agenda does not depend on whites viewing us as equals and therefore respecting us by demanding that we fulfill our responsibilites. Instead, blacks MUST be viewed as children to be taken care of (and will become very unruly if we are not!) or vicious animal beasts that must be pacified lest we attack them with our fangs and talons at worst.  And Randall Kennedy is only doing a more subtle form of the threat that Donna Brazile gave Hillary Clinton supporters wanting to allow the superdelegates to decide the nominee at the convention: that there would be rioting in the streets!

The worst part of it all was that after the W.E.B. Du Bois intellectual phase of the civil rights movement gave way to the street criminality tactics, the movement was basically led by THOSE WHO CLAIMED TO BE CHRISTIAN PREACHERS! Leave alone the fact that these Christian preachers were using subversive tactics that no interpretation of either the sermon on the mount or Romans 13 could support. Instead, consider the fact that instead of using the power of the gospel of Jesus Christ to uplift people into becoming new creations, conformed into the image of Jesus Christ, they used their bully pulpits to incite acts of rioting and criminality that debased and demeaned their followers, and then they further demeaned and debased their followers by confirming the worst of the racist thoughts and fears of white people against blacks in their minds! Instead of showing white people – and black people – how the gospel transforms blacks into the image of Jesus Christ, they decided to make merchandise out of their fear of sin and utter depravity. 

Who is this Randall Kennedy to suggest that blacks cannot countenance losing a presidential election just like everybody else? By overtly claiming that Obama’s loss will be only due to racism, Kennedy is calling on blacks NOT to accept it! Well what about it, Kennedy? Do whites have the same privilege? Do whites have the right to attribute a John McCain loss to race since 95% of blacks and (if current tracking polls are correct) 70% of Hispanics are going to vote for Obama? And should whites accept it? Is that not racial equality? But no. Kennedy does not want equality. He wants blacks to have the right to be angry like children, and to act out their anger as children are wont to do, while demanding that whites be mature adults. Because if blacks act like mature adults, he won’t be able to use us to shake anyone down, and if whites act like adults, there will not be anyone to pay the shakedown money, let alone actually run the businesses, schools, and government agencies that Barack HUSSEIN Obama would need in order to actually govern. 

But this is precisely the mentality inculcated by the civil rights preachers, and they did it by preaching a false gospel. The true gospel heals and elevates, not frustrates and denigrates. The true gospel sets captives free, not keeps them in bonds. And yes, the true gospel equips people to conduct themselves in a Christian manner no matter their financial, social, or political circumstances. Do any of these civil rights preachers speak of the poverty, oppression, and disenfranchisement experienced by the early church? The Roman Empire was a monarchy governed in a fascist manner. Virtually all Christians weren’t even citizens, which meant that they had no rights. Making things worse, Christianity was actually regarded as illegal. The rhetoric and ideology of the civil rights movement would have been completely irrelevant to the early church, and their tactics would have only resulted in Rome’s declaring all out war on Christians, which they did not do until 303 AD, by which time the faith was very firmly established. In short, had a Martin Luther King, Jr. been around in the early church, the result would have been no more church, and in short order. 

As a clear contrast to the tactics of the civil rights movement in whose steps this Kennedy person is following, the early church responded to their poverty and persecution with the fruits of the Holy Spirit: Love, Joy, Peace, Longsuffering, Kindness, Goodness, Faithfulness, Gentleness and Self-control. Their example was Jesus Christ’s praying for the forgiveness of His murderers while dying on the cross, and many Christian martyrs went to their deaths singing hymns and entreating onlookers to accept their faith. Seeing that the morality of a Christian population that was so put upon far exceeded their own licentious natures was a primary method of winning converts: people saw what the early Christians were going through and wanted to be like them! They were willing to give up their much more comfortable and accepted status in society to join the Christians in tribulation! This is in contrast with the civil rights preachers causing whites to so loathe, hate, and fear their black Christian followers that they would do anything to get away from them. The false Jesus Christ of the civil rights preacher, rather than saying “forgive them Father for they know not what they do” regarding His murderers, would have flashed gang signs, done vulgar sexual poses, and aimed profane tirades at people who had nothing to do with his execution as he was expiring. Instead of saying to the penitent thief “today you will be with me in paradise” as did the true Jesus Christ, the civil rights preacher’s false messiah would have joined the other thief in lamenting their inability to escape, join forces, and commit even more crimes! We should not be surprised because the Jesus Christ of Martin Luther King, Jr. was not born of a virgin, did not die for our sins, did not rise from the dead, is not the Son of God, and is not God incarnate.

This is precisely why we must reject the false gospel of the religious left. We must also reject the false gospel of the religious right. We must reject all false gospels that tells us that it is expedient and appropriate to conform ourselves to our temporal conditions and the ways of this world, and accept only the true gospel of Jesus Christ, which tells us to keep our Christian walk in this life focused on the eternal life to come. Civil rights leaders would have called such talk the message of the sellout who submits himself to injustice and white supremacy out of a fearful refusal to challenge it. It is precisely the same line of thought that led James Cone to declare that any god that did not support black liberation must be killed! My response: follow the God of the Bible or change your religion. Also, quit being so culturally chauvinistic! If you are a Christian in Iran, Saudi Arabia, Barack Obama’s Indonesia, etc. right now, the civil rights movement tactics will only result in your speedy death just as it would have in the early church. The true gospel equips its adherents for whatever circumstances that they will face. That the civil rights gospel was only applicable or effective to our own nation and culture is proof that it always was false to the entire world.

So Christians, black and white, Hispanic or Asian, do not conform to the ways of this world  in this matter or in any other. Instead, resist the devil and he will flee from you.

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Barack HUSSEIN Obama’s Anti – Christ Universalism

Posted by Job on September 4, 2008

From True Discernment weblog.

from Berit kjos:

Believes Many Paths Lead to God

The Faith of Barack Obama written by New York Times best-selling author Stephen Mansfield was released in August by Thomas Nelson publishers. The book carries the endorsement of Archbishop Desmond Tutu on the front cover. Tutu, one of the global “Elders,” calls the book “perceptive and well-written.” The publisher’s description of the book reads: 

“…takes readers inside the mind, heart, and soul of presidential hopeful Barack Obama–as a person of faith, as a man, as an American, and possibly as our future commander in chief.”

 

Mansfield, says: “If a man’s faith is sincere, it is the most important thing about him, and it is impossible to understand who he is and how he will lead without first understanding the religious vision that informs his life.”

According to Mansfield, Obama is “raising the banner of what he hopes will be the faith-based politics of a new generation . . . and he will carry that banner to whatever heights of power his God and the American people allow.”

Recently, when Obama was interviewed by Rick Warren, Obama told Warren that Jesus Christ was his Lord and Savior. Yet this “banner” Obama raises is one that has an inter-spiritual foundation, representing a new kind of “Christianity,” one that looks more like Brian McLaren’s spirituality than traditional, biblical Christianity.

What emerges from this book is a glimpse of a man who has New Age philosophy, believing that other religions are legitimate paths to God, and all humanity is connected together (spiritually speaking – i.e., God is in all):

“Obama does clearly believe that the form of Christianity that he committed to at Trinity Church in 1985 is not the only path to God. ‘I am rooted in the Christian tradition,’ he has said. Nevertheless he asserts, ‘I believe there are many paths to the same place and that is a belief there is a higher power, a belief that we are connected as a people.’

 

“He first saw his broad embrace of faith modeled by his mother. ‘In our household,” he has explained, ‘The Bible, [t]he Koran, and the Bhagavad Gita sat on the shelf … on Easter or Christmas Day my mother might drag me to a church, just as she dragged me to the Buddhist temple, the Chinese New Year celebration, the Shinto shrine, and ancient Hawaiian burial sites.’” (p.55 of Mansfield’s book, quoting from Audacity of Hope, Obama, p. 203).

 

After his inter-spiritually-based upbringing, Obama later spent twenty years in a church, which promotes the panenthestic (God in all), inter-spiritual approach. In a 2006 article in United Church News, Obama stated that the teachings of the UCC (United Church of Christ), of which he was a member (Trinity United Church of Christ) until recently, are “foundation stones for his political work.” Just what are those “teachings” comprised of? On Trinity’s website, on the Yoga page, the following statement is highlighted:

 

“Within each [of] us is the seed of Divinity. Each Soul is divine. I bow to the divinity in us all!”

This is classic Hinduism that teaches that divinity resides in every human being. It is also the message of the New Age movement — man’s divinity!

In Obama’s own autobiography, Audacity of Hope, he calls himself a “progressive” (i.e., emerging or postmodern) and says: “We need to take faith seriously not simply to block the religious right but to engage all persons of faith in the larger project of American renewal” (p. 216). Echoing the sentiments of Rick Warren (a close friend of Obama, says Warren), he clarifies that partnerships between “religious and secular” will have to be built, and “each side will need to accept some ground rules for collaboration” (p. 216). He adds:

 

“Whatever we once were, we are no longer just a Christian nation; we are also a Jewish nation, a Muslim nation, a Buddhist nation, a Hindu nation, and a nation of nonbelievers.” (p. 218)

Obama insists that to base national “policy” on biblical truths “would be a dangerous thing” to do (p. 220).

There is one sentence in Audacity of Hope that sums up Barack Obama’s spirituality. He states:

“When I read the Bible, I do so with the belief that it is not a static (stable) text but the Living Word and that I must be continually open to new revelations.” (p. 224) In other words, just as Tony Jones said in his book The New Christians, and just as other emergents consistently say, the truths in the written Word of God, the Bible, are not unchanging and cannot be looked upon as stable or immoveable. “New revelations” can bring about new “truths” . . . truth is fluid.

To be interspiritual (all paths lead to God), to be panentheistic (divinity is in all), to reject God’s Word, and to embrace mysticism is to be what Alice Bailey called a rejuvenated Christian, who is one who follows “another gospel” and “another Jesus” (II Corinthians 11:4).

 

“Jesus saith unto him, ‘I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by me.’” (John 14:6)

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Barack HUSSEIN Obama’s Path To Apostate Christianity

Posted by Job on July 13, 2008

See original link: Finding His Faith

So much has been made about Barack Obama’s religion. But what does he believe, and how did he arrive at those beliefs?

In 1981 Barack Obama was 20 years old, a Columbia University student in search of the meaning of life. He was torn a million different ways: between youth and maturity, black and white, coasts and continents, wonder and tragedy. He enrolled at Columbia in part to get far away from his past; he’d gone to high school in Hawaii and had just spent two years “enjoying myself,” as he puts it, at Occidental College in Los Angeles. In New York City, “I lived an ascetic existence,” Obama told NEWSWEEK in an interview on his campaign plane last week. “I did a lot of spiritual exploration. I withdrew from the world in a fairly deliberate way.” He fasted. Often, he’d go days without speaking to another person.

For company, he had books. There was Saint Augustine, the fourth-century North African bishop who wrote the West’s first spiritual memoir and built the theological foundations of the Christian Church. There was Friedrich Nietzsche, the 19th-century German philosopher and father of existentialism. There was Graham Greene, the Roman Catholic Englishman whose short novels are full of compromise, ambivalence and pain. Obama meditated on these men and argued with them in his mind.

When he felt restless on a Sunday morning, he would wander into an African-American congregation such as Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem. “I’d just sit in the back and I’d listen to the choir and I’d listen to the sermon,” he says, smiling a little as he remembers those early days in the wilderness. “There were times that I would just start tearing up listening to the choir and share that sense of release.”

Obama has spoken often and eloquently about the importance of religion in public life. But like many political leaders wary of offending potential backers, he has been less revealing about what hebelieves—about God, about prayer, about the connection between salvation and personal responsibility. In some respects, his reticence is understandable. Obama’s religious biography is unconventional and politically problematic. Born to a Christian-turned-secular mother and a Muslim-turned-atheist African father, Obama grew up living all across the world with plenty of spiritual influences, but without any particular religion. He is now a Christian, having been baptized in the early 1990s at Trinity United Church of Christ in Chicago. But rumors about Obama’s religion persist. In the new NEWSWEEK Poll, 12 percent of voters incorrectly believe he’s Muslim; more than a quarter believe he was raised in a Muslim home.

His baptism presents its own problems. The senior pastor at Trinity at the time of Obama’s baptism was the Rev. Jeremiah Wright Jr., the preacher who was seen damning America on cable TV for weeks last spring—and will doubtless be seen again this fall. In the NEWSWEEK Poll, almost half of the respondents say Obama shares at least some of Wright’s views; nearly a third say Wright might prevent them from voting for the presumptive Democratic nominee.

The story of Obama’s religious journey is a uniquely American tale. It’s one of a seeker, an intellectually curious young man trying to cobble together a religious identity out of myriad influences. Always drawn to life’s Big Questions, Obama embarked on a spiritual quest in which he tried to reconcile his rational side with his yearning for transcendence. He found Christ—but that hasn’t stopped him from asking questions. “I’m on my own faith journey and I’m searching,” he says. “I leave open the possibility that I’m entirely wrong.”

The story of Obama’s faith begins with his mother, Ann. Raised in the Midwest by two lapsed Christians, she lived and traveled throughout the world appreciating all religions but confessing to none. One of Ann’s favorite spiritual texts was “Joseph Campbell and the Power of Myth,” a set of PBS interviews with Bill Moyers that traces the common themes of religion and mythology, Obama’s half sister, Maya Soetoro-Ng, tells NEWSWEEK. When the family lived in Indonesia, Ann, on occasion, would take the children to Catholic mass; after returning to Hawaii, they would celebrate Easter and Christmas at United Church of Christ congregations. Ann later went back to Indonesia with Maya, and when Obama visited, they would take him to Borobudur, one of the largest Buddhist temples in the world. Later, while working in India, Ann lived for a time in a Buddhist monastery.

Visiting temples was not just tourism for Ann. “These kinds of experiences were a regular part of our childhood and our upbringing, and were important to [our mother] because they involved ritual,” says Maya. “She thought that ritual was very beautiful. The idea of human beings’ striving to be better, having the curiosity and questions about all these things, [was] perpetual and constant inside her.”

Did Ann believe in God? Obama calls his mother “an agnostic.” “I think she believed in a higher power,” he says. “She believed in the fundamental order and goodness of the universe. She would have been very comfortable with Einstein’s idea that God doesn’t play dice. But I think she was very suspicious of the notion that one particular organized religion offered one truth.”

Obama’s father, raised Muslim in Kenya, was, by the time he met Ann, “a confirmed atheist” who considered religion “mumbo jumbo,” writes Obama in “The Audacity of Hope.” (Barack Obama Sr. left the family when Obama was 2.) During his years in Indonesia, Obama went first to a Catholic school—and then to a public elementary school with a weekly class of religious education that reflected the dominant Muslim culture. He was raised, in part, by his stepfather, a man named Lolo, who “like many Indonesians … followed a brand of Islam that could make room for the remnants of more ancient animist and Hindu faiths,” Obama wrote in “Dreams From My Father.” “He explained that a man took on the powers of whatever he ate.” Lolo introduced young Obama to the taste of dog meat, snake meat and roasted grasshopper. In Indonesia, Obama has said, he saw women with and without head coverings and Muslims living comfortably next to Christians. He has said that his life among Muslims in Indonesia showed him that “Islam can be compatible with the modern world.”

Though Obama was a serious student in Hawaii—and, even then, a seeker—”Dreams” describes an adolescence there of predictable teenage drinking and smoking (and basketball). During his first two years of college at Occidental, he says, he was “not taking anything particularly seriously, or at least, on the surface, not taking anything particularly seriously.” After transferring to Columbia, though, the spiritual quest began in earnest.

People who knew him around that time describe a reserved, monkish man, uninterested in the extracurriculars of New York student life: bars, socializing, gossiping. William Araiza was in a political-science seminar with Obama their senior year, and what he remembers most is Obama’s detachment. “I don’t want to imply he was intentionally aloof, he just seemed like he wasn’t part of the college gang,” Araiza says. “He was the kind of guy who didn’t live in the dorms, didn’t hang out on campus.”

Obama’s first job out of college was at Business International, a research service in New York. “There was a lot of socializing,” says Beth Noymer Levine, one of Obama’s colleagues. “Here you had a hotbed of young singles—from the socializing there would be some storytelling—but [Obama] pretty much stayed out of that stuff … He was very together, very mature, and I was 23 and felt like a train wreck next to him.”

Obama says his spiritual quest was driven by two main impulses. He was looking for a community that he could call home—a sense of rootedness and belonging he missed from his biracial, peripatetic childhood. The visits to the black churches uptown helped fulfill that desire. “There’s a side very particular to the African-American church tradition that was powerful to me,” he says. The exuberant worship, the family atmosphere and the prophetic preaching at a church such as Abyssinian would have appealed to a young man who lived so in his head. And he became obsessed with the civil-rights movement. He’d become convinced, through his reading, of the transforming power of social activism, especially when paired with religion. This is not an uncommon revelation among the spiritually and progressively minded. (“There’s no more dramatic story in American life” than the story of the civil-rights movement, says North Carolina Rep. David Price, who knows Obama professionally and writes about politics and religion. “You could not continue to be kind and gentle in your personal life and also be denying other people’s humanity.”) When Gerald Kellman recruited Obama to go to Chicago as a community organizer, he remembers, the young man was “very much caught up in the world of ideas.” He was devouring Taylor Branch’s “Parting the Waters,” which is part history of the civil-rights movement, part biography of Martin Luther King Jr.

In Chicago, Obama found that organizers and activists there (and elsewhere) were employing a progressive theology to motivate faith groups to action. Using the writings of Paul Tillich and, especially, Reinhold Niebuhr—and also King, African-American and Roman Catholic liberation theologians, and Christian fathers like Saint Augustine—local religious leaders emphasized original sin and human imperfection. Christ’s gift of salvation was to the community of believers, not to individual people in isolation. It was therefore the responsibility of the faithful to help each other—through deeds—to respond to the call of perfection that will be fully realized only at the end of time. Adherents of this particular theology frequently refer to Matthew 25: “Whatever you neglected to do unto the least of these, you neglected to do unto me.” Everyone, in other words, is in this salvation thing together.

Obama’s organizing days helped clarify his sense of faith and social action as intertwined. “It’s hard for me to imagine being true to my faith—and not thinking beyond myself, and not thinking about what’s good for other people, and not acting in a moral and ethical way,” he says. When these ideas merged with his more emotional search for belonging, he was able to arrive at the foot of the cross. He “felt God’s spirit beckoning me,” he writes in “Audacity.” “I submitted myself to His will, and dedicated myself to discovering His truth.”

Was it a conversion in the sense that he heard Jesus speaking to him in a moment after which nothing was the same? No. “It wasn’t an epiphany,” he says. “A bolt of lightning didn’t strike me and suddenly I said, ‘Aha!’ It was a more gradual process that traced back to those times that I had spent in New York wandering the streets or reading books, where I decided that the meaning I found in my life, the values that were most important to me, the sense of wonder that I had, the sense of tragedy that I had—all these things were captured in the Christian story.” And how much of the decision was pragmatic, motivated by Obama’s desire, as he says in “Dreams,” to get closer to the people he was trying to help? “I thought being part of a community and affirming my faith in a public fashion was important,” Obama says.

The cross under which Obama went to Jesus was at the controversial Trinity United Church of Christ. It was a good fit. “That community of faith suited me,” Obama says. For one thing, Trinity insisted on social activism as a part of Christian life. It was also a family place. Members refer to the sections in the massive sanctuary as neighborhoods; churchgoers go to the same neighborhood each Sunday and they get to know the people who sit near them. They know when someone’s sick or got a promotion at work. Jeremiah Wright, whom Obama met in the context of organizing, became a friend; after he married, Obama says, the two men would sometimes get together “after church to have chicken with the family—and we would have talked stories about our families.” In his preaching, Wright often emphasized the importance of family, of staying married and taking good care of children. (Obama’s recent Father’s Day speech, in which he said that “responsibility does not end at conception,” was not cribbed from Wright—but the premise could have been.) At the point of his decision to accept Christ, Obama says, “what was intellectual and what was emotional joined, and the belief in the redemptive power of Jesus Christ, that he died for our sins, that through him we could achieve eternal life—but also that, through good works we could find order and meaning here on Earth and transcend our limits and our flaws and our foibles—I found that powerful.”

Maya says their mother would not have made the same choice—but that Ann understood and approved of Obama’s decision: “She didn’t feel the same need, because for her, she felt like we can still be good to one another and serve, but we don’t have to choose. She was, of course, always a wanderer, and I think he was more inclined to be rooted and make the choice to set down his commitments more firmly.”

After his stint as an organizer, Obama went to Harvard Law School. He didn’t officially join Trinity until several years later, when he returned to Chicago as a promising young lawyer intent on becoming a husband, a father and a professional success. Around the time Obama was baptized, he says he studied the Bible with gifted teachers who would “gently poke me about my faith.” As young marrieds, Barack and Michelle (who also didn’t go to church regularly as a child) went to church fairly often—two or three times a month. But after their first child, Malia, was born, they found making the effort more difficult. “I don’t know if you’ve had the experience of taking young, squirming children to church, but it’s not easy,” he says. “Trinity was always packed, and so you had to get there early. And if you went to the morning service, you were looking at—it just was difficult. So that would cut back on our involvement.”

After he began his run for the U.S. Senate, he says, the family sometimes didn’t go to Trinity for months at a time. The girls have not attended Sunday school. The family says grace at mealtime, and he talks to the children about God whenever they have questions. “I’m a big believer in a faith that is not imposed but taps into what’s already there, their curiosity or their spirit,” he says.

Amid the hubbub, Obama continued to try to work out for himself what it meant to be a person of faith. In 1999, while still in the Illinois State Senate, he shared an office suite with Ira Silverstein, an Orthodox Jew. Obama peppered Silverstein with questions about Orthodox restrictions on daily life: the kosher laws and the sanctions against certain kinds of behavior on the Sabbath. “On the Sabbath, if I ever needed anything, Barack would always offer,” remembers Silverstein. “Some of the doors are electric, so he would offer to open them … I didn’t expect that.”

Since severing ties with Wright and Trinity, Obama is a little spiritually rootless again. He lost a friend in Wright—and he lost a home, however tenuous those ties may have been toward the end, in Trinity. He has not found a new church, and he doesn’t plan to look for one until after the election. “There’s an aspect of the campaign process that would not make it a good time to figure out whether a particular church community worked for us,” he says. “Because of what happened at Trinity, we’d be under a spotlight.”

Nevertheless, his spiritual life on the campaign trail survives. He says he prays every day, typically for “forgiveness for my sins and flaws, which are many, the protection of my family, and that I’m carrying out God’s will, not in a grandiose way, but simply that there is an alignment between my actions and what he would want.” He sometimes reads his Bible in the evenings, a ritual that “takes me out of the immediacy of my day and gives me a point of reflection.” Thanks to the efforts of his religious outreach team, he has an army of clerics and friends praying for him and e-mailing him snippets of Scripture or Midrash to think about during the day.

The Rev. Kirbyjon Caldwell—who gave the invocations at both of George W. Bush’s inaugurals and presided over the wedding of the president’s daughter Jenna—is among those on Obama’s prayer team. When Caldwell talks about Obama, he can barely keep the emotion out of his voice. The thing that impresses him most, he says, is that when he asks Obama, “What can I pray for?” Obama always says, “Michelle and the girls.” “He never says, ‘Pray for me, pray for my campaign, pray that folks will quit bashing me.’ He always says, ‘Pray for Michelle and my girls’.”

But Obama’s faith is not without its critics. Some on the right say his particular brand of Christianity is a modern amalgam—unorthodox, undisciplined, even insincere. Last month Dr. James Dobson accused Obama of “deliberately distorting the traditional understanding of the Bible to fit his own world view, his own confused theology.” The campaign responded that Obama was reaching out to people of faith and standing up for families.

When Franklin Graham asked Obama recently how, as a Christian, he could reconcile New Testament claims that salvation was attainable only through Christ with a campaign that embraces pluralism and diversity, Obama tells NEWSWEEK he said: “It is a precept of my Christian faith that my redemption comes through Christ, but I am also a big believer in the Golden Rule, which I think is an essential pillar not only of my faith but of my values and my ideals and my experience here on Earth. I’ve said this before, and I know this raises questions in the minds of some evangelicals. I do not believe that my mother, who never formally embraced Christianity as far as I know … I do not believe she went to hell.” Graham, he said, was very gracious in reply. Should Obama beat John McCain, he has history on his side. Presidents such as Lincoln and Jefferson were unorthodox Christians; and, according to a Pew Forum survey, 70 percent of Americans agree with the statement that “many religions can lead to eternal life.” “My particular set of beliefs,” Obama says, “may not be perfectly consistent with the beliefs of other Christians.”

Last March, when video clips of Wright damning America blitzed the airwaves, Obama wrote a speech about race that he hoped would save his campaign. But it was, to some, also a speech about faith. Obama tried to explain his relationship with his pastor, to appeal to Americans’ sense of the best in themselves. He spoke of racial divides in America as “a part of ourselves we have yet to perfect,” and of his pastor as a flawed, human creature. “That speech,” says Paul Elie, the Catholic author of “The Life You Save May Be Your Own,” “is steeped in Christianity. We have relationships, they’re all flawed, we’re all broken. You can’t renounce your history with a person at a stroke, we have to fare forward with other imperfect people and resist the claims to perfection coming from both sides.” After Wright’s performance a month later at the National Press Club, Elie says, Obama was right—and Christian—to repudiate him.

Did Obama see the race speech as a religion speech? Last week, aboard the campaign plane, he said: “Race is a central test of our belief that we’re our brother’s keeper, our sister’s keeper … There’s a sense that if we are to get beyond our racial divides, that it should be neat and pretty, whereas part of my argument was that it’s going to be hard and messy—and that’s where faith comes in.” As the general election wears on, Obama will have to summon all of his faith, in all of its complexity. Few things in life are harder, or messier, than the last months of a presidential campaign. © 2008 Newsweek

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Barack HUSSEIN Obama’s Apostate Christian Beliefs

Posted by Job on July 13, 2008

Original link: ‘I Am a Big Believer in Not Just Words, But Deeds and Works’

Barack Obama talked to NEWSWEEK’s Lisa Miller and Richard Wolffe about how faith plays into his everyday life. Excerpts:

NEWSWEEK: Do you and Michelle talk to your girls about having a God? Jesus?
Obama: Well, we do, but we don’t have a systematic course of study for the girls. We say grace at the table. They are inquiring minds, so whenever they have a question about God or faith, then I have a conversation with them … I’m a big believer in a faith that is not imposed but taps into what’s already there, their curiosity or their spirit.

You said you didn’t hear a lot of the sermons at Trinity. How often did you go?
At the beginning, we went fairly frequently. We were single, so I’d say we probably went two or three times a month. When we had Malia, our first child, we went less frequently, and that probably continued for a couple of years, just because—I don’t know if you’ve had the experience of taking young, squirming children to church, but it’s not easy … As they got older, we would go back a little more frequently, probably twice a month. But then I started campaigning for the United States Senate, and at that point I was in church every Sunday, maybe two, three churches a Sunday, but they weren’t Trinity—because that was one of the most effective ways for us to campaign and reach out to people. So, there was quite a big chunk of time, especially during the Senate race, where we might not have gone to Trinity for two, three months at a time.

You used to travel with your Bible. Do you still do that?
Sometimes, because my briefcase gets so packed, I forget to pack it, but I often have my Bible with me. It’s something that I read in the evenings and it takes me out of the immediacy of my day and gives me a point of reflection.

What do you think about the Kingdom of God? Is it attainable on Earth by humans?
I am a big believer in not just words, but deeds and works. I don’t believe that the Kingdom of God is achievable on Earth without God’s intervention, and without God’s return through Jesus Christ, but I do believe in improvement.

What is the role of doubt in faith?
I wrote about this in “Audacity of Hope,” that even after I accepted Jesus Christ as my Lord and Savior, that doesn’t mean that I don’t have doubts. I had doubts when my mother died. I have doubts every time I pick up the newspaper.

Do you pray in your personal life?
Yes, I do.

Daily?
Yeah, every day.

What do you pray for?
Forgiveness for my sins and flaws, which are many, the protection of my family, and that I’m carrying out God’s will, and not in a grandiose way, but simply that there is an alignment between my actions and what he would want. And then I find myself sometimes praying for people who need a lift, need a hand.

Is there a time you have had to make a decision that was important and you called on God? Can you walk us through that?
Well, that’s pretty personal. I’m not sure I’d want to walk you through that. I mean, I prayed on marrying Michelle because that’s a pretty big decision, getting married. So I wanted to make sure I got that right, and I did. So, prayer worked. I prayed on running for president. That’s a big decision that had an immediate impact on my family—and that I knew, win or lose, would have an impact on the country. Had I run a miserable race, that would have had an impact on the country. Should I win, that carries with it enormous responsibilities. I’ve spent a lot of time in prayer on that.  © 2008

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My Main Concern With Barack HUSSEIN Obama: His Victory Would Make Liberation Theology Seem Rick Warren Purpose Driven!

Posted by Job on April 9, 2008

I have heard about the nightmare scenarios about a Barack Obama presidency: the anti – Christ thing, the Muslim thing, the inexperience thing, the far – left thing, etc. and to tell the truth none of them concern me terribly much. Allowing them to do so would require my dismissing from consideration the things that some of our past presidents – and our current one! – have done, or pretending that I find John McCain or Hillary Clinton in any way more to my liking. On the last point in particular, let me tell you that in their own way, each of them is immensely dangerous to the interests of Christianity!

But speaking of Christianity, do not mistake this as a statement that Barack HUSSEIN Obama is the one most worthy of opposition, for I legitimately feel that such is the case. Still, in Christian terms, there is one aspect of an Obama presidency that I find extremely worrisome: the potential that his presidency would lead to a mainstream acceptance of liberation theology. Perhaps not the radical and separatist version espoused by Jeremiah Wright and James Cone, but definitely a more commercialized, homogenized, domesticated, works – centered (PURPOSE DRIVEN?) version of it.

Now as you may know, liberation theology was given to the world by the Roman Catholic Church after the Second Vatican Council. For a time there was a chance of it becoming very influential to mainstream Catholic and Protestant Christianity, but the doctrine suffered a major setback when the very Roman Catholic Church that birthed it began opposing it in a major way in the 1980s. But were Barack Obama to win the White House, there is the potential that this system could again assert itself.

You see, many may underestimate what electing a black President would mean to America’s black citizens. It is not that blacks feel that Barack Obama would enact a raft of laws and policies favoring blacks. Rather, it would be a major symbolic victory, a sign that America is turning its back on its racist past and ready to accept a fairer future. It would signal that at long last, blacks are fully recognized and accepted as equals – as Americans – by a nation that in every way imaginable denied conceding such. You think this to be foolish? Well consider this: we are less than 25 years removed from blacks being regularly featured on television commercials. That occurrence coincided right about the time of the celebrity of Michael Jordan and the success of “The Cosby Show.” Many companies feared that featuring blacks in their commercials would result in white consumers shunning their products! And yes, it has been less than 15 years since blacks began to regularly play quarterback in the NFL. When asked about the controversy in the early 1990s, NFL head coach Jimmy Johnson stated on Fox Sports that a lot of coaches regarded blacks as not being smart enough to read NFL defenses. This trivia may seem to be just that, but it is evidence of how racism so deeply permeated and tainted everything in American life, even the trivial, and it explains why people that are black like me are capable of getting so worked up over things that appear to be so small! But to so many blacks, the election of Obama would signal that the long nightmare of being second – class citizens is about to end.

This is not to say, of course, that all or even most of these people are obsessed with racial victimization. Quite the contrary, conservative views on race such as those espoused by Bill Cosby are much more popular in the black community than is let on. Many blacks are very much concerned about the cultural problems in the black community: crime, illegitimacy, educational failure, etc. It is just that we are unwilling to discuss them in response to the baiting of conservative racists (who can be of any race) that wield these issues not intending to contribute towards solving them, but rather to use them to justify racism (including but certainly not limited to their own). But in Barack and Michelle Obama, such blacks see hope in that respect as well: Harvard Law School graduates, married, and parents of two daughters. Even Barack Obama’s drug use makes him only a more practical role model in the eyes of those who found the aforementioned Cosby Show “too perfect” and “evading the real problems of the black community”, sort of the ideal anti – hero for our cynical postmodern times. So yes, blacks would look to the Obamas as role models for themselves and the black community, and Barack Obama in particular to serve this role for the very troubled black male.

So were Obama to fulfill these dreams for black America, everything that took Obama to the mountaintop, that got him to that brass ring, that he used to bring to fruition the wildest fantasies of the descendants of slaves, would become absorbed into the shared collective black experience. And a great part of Obama’s everything is, of course, none other than Jeremiah Wright. Jeremiah Wright’s theology, doctrines, sermons, mentoring, etc. (the media is not shy about calling Wright Obama’s “father figure”) will all become a major part of the narrative of how a confused biracial young man went on to become the first black President. And of course, scores of black people will want to apply what worked so well for Barack Obama into their own communities, their own churches, and their own lives.

Let me say two things about this. First, it is the American way! All Americans of all races have been assimilating the traits of successful people, of leaders, into their own being since this country was founded. And yes, the cult of personality has always been very much a factor in American religious life. Second, with respect to the black community in general, there is already precedent. Who is unaware of the huge impact on black religious life that one Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. had? Well, as important as Dr. King is to black America, King never became president (a fact that Hillary Clinton, for reasons that made no sense unless she was TRYING to lose the race, taunted supporters of Obama and King with back in January during the very week of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday … let me point out by the way that if Hillary Clinton and the Republicans in nominating McCain – a fellow that most Republicans don’t even LIKE – are giving Obama every possible shot at victory). So then, the effect of Obama on the black religious landscape might even exceed that of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King’s!

But that is just American blacks, right? Wrong. There has been a provincial, chauvinistic even, tendency among blacks to overstate this, but American blacks are quite often trendsetters. American blacks set trends for blacks in other regions: Africa, Latin America, etc. Now liberation theology is already more of a factor in those regions than in America, so Obama’s election would give the advocates of that belief system in those areas precisely what they need (and that speaks nothing of the Hispanic, Asian, and white adherents of it). And yes, blacks do set trends for whites in America. American whites, in turn, set trends for white people elsewhere in the world. So world, liberation theology brought to you by Barack Hussein Obama. What, Obama is a Muslim? Well, what better belief system for the secular moderate Muslims to buy into? And the secular moderate Hindus? Buddhists? People that are just, well, secular and moderate? And so on …

Again, a key component to remember is that it will NOT be the same liberation theology as advocated by David Cone and Jeremiah Wright. As a matter of fact, not even the black nationalism or Afrocentrism portion of the messages of Cone and Wright will be overly offensive in time. After all, the current image of Martin Luther King, Jr. is nothing like the man with exceptionally radical views and confrontational methods that actually lived. Does anyone remember that Muhammad Ali was once a member of the Nation of Islam? Nope. And even Malcolm X had his black history month commemorative soda cups sold by McDonald’s! The same will be done with liberation theology. It will be packaged and sold like a commercial product just like everything else in America, and when that happens, it may just find a nation – a globe! – of willing consumers in our churches just waiting to devour it. And why not? In their determined zeal to run away from the true Jesus Christ of the Bible, the cross, and the empty tomb, has not Christianity shown itself more than willing to devour everything else? This, people, is no different, and when you consider a great many of the other falsities ingested into popular Christianity over the ages, liberation theology, black or otherwise, is not so radical after all. Is it?

The Three Step Salvation Plan

Posted in abomination, abortion, abortion rights, black history month, false doctrine, false preacher, false preachers, false prophet, false religion, false teachers, false teaching, hate speech, Hinduism, homophobia, homosexuality, identity politics, idolatry, Jesus Christ | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 15 Comments »

 
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